Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Green Jobs: A Case Study of New Boat Toliets

What sectors will produce new "green jobs"? Now I know the answer --- the boating sector! I have always been worried about boater used toliet paper polluting our water and now I can rest peacefully. Here is the headline: Swash Eco-Seat Allowing Boaters to Cast Away Their Toilet Paper Advanced Toilet Seat from Brondell Reduces Waterway Sewage


Contact:

Tricia Kent
Director
Avalon Communications
http://www.avalon-comm.com


San Francisco, CA – July 21, 2009 – The estimated 70 million Americans who are expected to hit the waterways this year can cast away more than just their cares when they set sail. Now they can also leave the toilet paper behind. Innovatively designed with a water wash cleansing system, the Swash Eco-Seat by Brondell is the eco-friendly boater’s answered prayer. By installing Eco-Seats on their vessels, boaters can reduce toilet paper use by 75 percent, thereby drastically cutting back on waterway sewage. In the process, they can also save themselves the all-too-frequent headache of clogged heads.

According to a recent “Women’s Health” magazine article, “The average ship has hundreds of bathrooms and produces 210,000 gallons of sewage per week.” And it’s not just large vessels that are contributing to the problem. Much of this waste can be attributed to the massive amounts of toilet paper being used.

Indeed, toilet paper manufacturer Charmin estimates that “on average, consumers use 8.6 sheets per trip – a total of 57 sheets per day. That’s an annual total of 20,805 sheets.” Therefore, a typical 3,000-passenger ship on a week-long journey uses 1,197,000 toilet papers sheets each day. If that same ship were to replace all of its toilet seats with a Swash Eco-Seat, the number of sheets consumed on the same voyage could be reduced to 299,250.

Norio Sugano of Sausalito, Calif., is the proud owner of the Seeker (Tatoosh 51) sailboat. He recently installed a Swash 250 toilet seat in his forward cabin and a Swash 550 in his aft cabin and is enjoying no longer having to worry about clogged heads. He had this to say of his experience, “My installation went very quickly. I just replaced the old toilet seat with the Brondell unit. In the period [since their installation], both units have been working extraordinarily well. What’s more, I have not purchased any toilet paper since I installed the Swashes. The leftover toilet paper has been used to wipe around the toilets. The Swash actually works and benefits me. Overall, I highly recommend these advanced toilet seats, not only for boating, but for regular households as well.”

Sugano closes on a valid point. While disposal of sewage on the high seas is a complicated process that is mandated by laws, seafarers, obviously, aren’t the only ones who produce it. Landlubbers are just as likely to overdo things in the TP department. By installing a Swash Eco-Seat in their homes, individuals can not only cut down on sewage, but they can also enjoy the product’s additional benefits like heated seat warmer, remote control and heated dryer.

Boaters who are seeking an easier and eco-friendlier way to deal with their sewage can visit Brondell’s Swash Eco-Seat line online at http://www.brondell.com. Interested media may arrange a meeting with company management by calling (772) 633-8337.



About Brondell

Based in San Francisco, California, Brondell is a privately held developer of innovative, quality bathroom products. Brondell currently sells the Swash™ line of high-tech toilet seats in retailers across the United States and Canada. The company also manufactures the Breeza and Breeza Warm seats, which feature an innovative design and patent-pending 4-stage deodorizing system that automatically eliminates bathroom odors at the source. Both lines reflect Brondell's commitment to quality product design. All of the company’s offerings deliver comfort and cleanliness to young and old alike, setting a new standard for luxury and personal hygiene in the bathroom.

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1 comment :

Neil said...

If it is a bidet like system, what about the extra water it uses? From an environmental perspective, I am sure this is an improvement over TP, but it does seem like a waste of scarce fresh water on a boat.